Internet Governance

The First Deliverable on the Roadmap to Internet Privacy

Last week I wrote about why ServInt cares about fighting for consumer privacy, and how we are approaching our goal of reforming U.S. surveillance law. ServInt’s Roadmap to Internet Privacy is not unlike a roadmap that a developer would use to bring a piece of software to market. It’s unrealistic to get everything you need into one release, so you design a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) that you can iteratively build on top of.

Today, ServInt joined a coalition of more than 40 organizations demanding that the U.S. Congress reform Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act. This is the MVP we need to kickstart the Roadmap to Internet Privacy.

The letter was sent to U.S. government officials and came from privacy and human rights advocates, technology companies and trade associations – including the American Civil Liberties Union, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Mozilla, ServInt partner CloudFlare, and the Internet Infrastructure Coalition (i2Coalition).

The letter listed the elements all signers agreed are essential to any effort to reform our nation’s surveillance laws. These include a clear, strong, and effective end to bulk collection practices as well as transparency and accountability mechanisms for both government and company reporting.

Surveillance reform is urgently needed to restore consumer faith in the cloud. ServInt believes that mass surveillance is wrong and we are committed to doing everything we can to stop it, on behalf of our customers and the industry as a whole. I’m proud that ServInt has been one of the Internet industry’s most vocal critics of the U.S. government’s mass surveillance programs, and has called on legislators to help restore the image of the United States as a country that cares about privacy and the rule of law.

Be sure to view the full text of the letter and the list of signers.

Photo by Beck Gusler

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